Tag:Vin Scully
Posted on: October 29, 2012 1:30 am
 

One Giant Leap for San Fran-kind

California and baseball, they were made for each other. They go together like hot dogs & mustard, guacamole & chips, politics & debate. Kismet.

Long before Walter O’Malley (Dodgers) and Horace Stoneham (Giants) moved their New York business interests cross-country to the Golden State (‘58), the game of baseball was already well-situated on the Pacific Coast, producing such gems as Joe DiMaggio (SF / Martinez) and Ted Williams (San Diego).

But a major league presence? That’s a whole ‘nother ball-game. Big doings.

And when the franchise moves were being planned in 1957, there was no question the Los Angeles team would have the bigger impact on the State and baseball. LA was three-times the size of San Francisco and since WW2 had been fast displacing the Bay area as the undeniable epicenter for the State’s burgeoning commerce and entertainment industry.

While the Giants fielded an impressive roster at their new digs with names like Mays, Cepeda, Perry, McCovey & Marichal, they would reach but one World Series before 1989, losing the memorable 1962 fall classic to long-time rival the Yankees, 4-3.

Down South the Dodgers hit the ground running. In only their second season in Chavez Ravine, the boys in blue hosted a World Series (‘59) and broke with tradition by taking it. Then they did it again in ‘63 and ‘65. Transplanted Brooklynites Walter Alston, Duke Snider, Koufax, Drysdale and LA original Maury Wills all became the talk of the nation.

Soon thereafter, three more teams would call California home: the Angels in 1961 (Anaheim ‘66); Charlie Finley’s Kansas City Athletics (Oakland ’68) and the fledgling San Diego Padres (‘69), owned today by Peter O‘Malley, son of Walter.

Though fan support has fluctuated, the As have been a stalwart organization, hoisting six pennants in Oakland, three times that of its NL rival across the Bay. The Padres have made two Series (‘84 / ‘98) and the Angels took their lone title in 2002.

It’s always been the Dodgers who’ve held a special place in the hearts of most Californians. A second wave of success in the 70s & 80s secured this spot as they appeared in five more Series, capturing crowns in ‘81 & ‘88.

But since those halcyon days of Garvey, Valenzuela, Hershiser, Gibson & Lasorda, there have been no more pennants unfurled over Dodger Stadium. Only broadcast legend Vin Scully, planning on a return in 2013, gives the grounds its championship feel.

You can‘t live off the past forever.

Even with some plucky mid-season moves in 2012 (Ramirez / Boston cast-offs) and new investor Earvin “Magic” Johnson joining the ownership group, the Dodgers again missed the post-season, forcing their fandom to watch arch-rival San Francisco bask in the glow of a playoffs spotlight to which they’re growing quite accustomed.

With the San Francisco Giants winning their second championship in three seasons (2010) by besting the heavily-favored Detroit Tigers 4-0 in World Series 2012, baseball aficionados are left scratching their heads in befuddlement.

Explanations for the surprising result range from the sensible (Giants’ pitching), to the whiney (DH fans), to my own guess (homer-happy AL can‘t adjust) and finally the strange (“funky spin” on the ball / ESPN’s Aaron Boone). That last one sounds like a “Dirk Diggler” dance move (Boogie Nights / ‘97).

To say the Giants’ victory is an upset rings as trite as saying ‘Have a nice day.’ I don’t know what an upset is anymore. Basketball excepted, the watch-words in today’s sporting world are ‘expect the unexpected.’ Exactly when & where the upset occurs, that’s the conundrum for prognosticators, week in, week out.

Can’t say the same for politics, unless you go back to 1948 and Harry “The buck stops here” Truman. That’s bad news for Mr. Romney, though he does have Diebold on his side (vote machines). And then there’s his ace in the hole, that GOP stand-by (10x) and vestige of our powder-wigged forefathers, the one, the only, tah-dah: Electoral College.

Tonight I'm sensing seismic waves emanating from the West Coast. But don’t be alarmed, California folk. I don’t mean the plate tectonic variety. What I sense is a major shifting in the balance of baseball power in your grand State.

The Giants 2012 World Series title moves the center of California’s baseball universe upstate to San Francisco, leaving the Dodgers, Angels, Padres and neighboring Athletics as mere satellites orbiting the bright star that has become the Giants.

And yes, stars can fade, just like the Dodgers did by way of a lackadaisical ownership that dates back to the early 90s. But this a big leap for the Bay area G-Men. Multiple titles will start the dynasty discussion and can be the first serious step towards becoming a standard-bearer organization, i.e., the Yankees, Red Wings, Lakers, Packers, Patriots.

Astronaut Neil Armstrong (1930-2012) took one doozey of a step back in 1969 when he left the safety of Apollo 11 and became the first Earthling to venture forth onto the meteor maligned surface of the Moon. The San Francisco Giants’ hope the historical step they took in Detroit this October 28, 2012 proves to be just as memorable to baseball fans as Mr. Armstrong’s famous step has been to the world.

Steven Keys
Can o' Corn
Posted on: September 14, 2012 12:25 am
 

Pick ya' Poison: MLB vs NFL

Summer’s on the wane and there’s a nip in the nighttime air. That means three things: school is back in session, baseball is heating-up and the pigskins are flying.

It’s a heady time for fans of America’s two favorite sports. Richard Kimble (The Fugitive) knew the score: “So, what are you, a football player, baseball player?,” asked the good doctor / janitor as he tweaked the orders and wheeled young “Joel” to life-saving surgery.

While one sport is in the home stretch as contenders separate from pretenders and try to finish in the money (playoffs), the other is just outta’ the gate where gridiron gladiators look to hit their stride and jockey for the inside rail to build an early lead.

It’s a daunting choice come Sunday afternoon. Which sport do you watch on TV?

Do you get vested in the pennant races or dive into the game you’ve been yearning for ever since Eli hoisted his second Lombardi trophy last February? Life’s tough decisions.

5 Reasons to Choose Baseball

Reason #1: MLB’s smokin’ hot!

All three American divisions are in play with late-bloomers Baltimore and Tampa Bay joining the chase while the Swingin’ As of Oakland are doing their damndest to make sure those highfalutin Texans don’t go popping any corks anytime soon.

Ever since writer / ESPN commentator Skip Bayless publicly speculated on Derek Jeter’s supplement regime back in August, the Yanks got defensive and lost focus at the worst time (no player’s above suspicion until testing is tightened with an in-season blood draw).

And if you can’t get energized about the rise of the Nationals and the terrific seasons of rookie Mike Trout (LAA), slugger supreme Miguel Cabrera (DET), comeback kid Buster Posey (SF), re-invented R.A. Dickey (NYM), Mr. consistency Derek Jeter (NYY) or moundsmen David Price (TB) and Jered Weaver (LAA), you’ve got the heartbeat of a hibernating bear.

Reason #2: Baseball’s clean’in‘ up

No big Nielsens booster but still nice to know at least one of the pro-sports you watch is trying to put game back into the business. Rather than cause for cynicism, recent busts (Braun / Melky / Colon) are sign the PED-prevention program is working. Whereas, kid brother football keeps twiddling its thumbs, hoping cries for PED testing are drowned-out by a diverting media while their rippling-membership are given ample time to make the necessary adjustments before the inevitable blood-draw comes knocking.

Reason #3: Fewer TV commercials

Baseball does its share of shill during a telecast, that’s for sure, but it doesn’t compare to the commercial tidal wave to which NFL fans are subjected during a turf-battle broadcast.

Holy cow! Change of possession, TV time-out; injured or embarrassed player, TV time-out; coach’s challenge, TV-TO; official review, TV-TO; quarter-change, TV-TO; studio update, TV-TO. You get the idea. If you like commercials, football is your thing.

Reason #4: Baseball’s tougher than football

How could I make such a ludicrous statement, you ask? I’ll tell you how in two words: sticky-gloves, otherwise known as sissy-gloves. This ain’t your father’s football.

The handy-work of NFL entrepreneurs and glove manufacturers, this foray into cozy is nothing more than a nationwide money-grab (covering high school hands coast-to-coast) and an offense-enhancer to assist the catch-challenged in the same way the 5-foot wedge-putter and cantaloupe-sized driver head give welfare to the golfing community while making cash registers ring.

And spare me the safety claim. I’ll concede their worth in sub-zero temps (Lombardi & Bud Grant were cool customers), but if anything, they may reduce safety by the increased friction they create for hand, wrist and neck movement in tackling. And 9 outta’ 10 of those so-called miraculous grabs ESPN anchors go ga-ga over are directly attributable to the sticky-gloves. It ain’t rocket science and it ain‘t spectacular.

MLB has it’s own gear, sure, but it’s protective (sometimes TOO much) for players as well as fans in the seats (flying bats). Stand in a batter’s box someday and you’ll know what I‘m writing about. Suffice to say, baseball gear has a purpose beyond coinage.

Reason #5: One last look at Greatness?

Faux-sport fans will often bring up John Unitas when they hate on the aged. John stayed a year too long in the NFL (Chargers). But those who love on the game, whether baseball or football, take great pleasure in catching one last glimpse (or ear-shot) of greatness.

Everyone knows future HOF’ers Chipper Jones (ATL) and Omar Vizquel (TOR) are on goodbye-tours, but there are other players with the glow of greatness who have yet to decide or declare their future plans but might be giving their final curtain call.

Jamie Moyer (COL / cut) and Mariano Rivera (DL) were out early, Jim Thome found a spot (on DL) with the upstart Orioles, Jason Giambi still has fire (COL) and injuries have caught up with sweet-swingin’ Lance Berkman (STL). To those who ultimately pack it in, Vaya con Dios, mis amigos. Thanks for the memories.

And don’t forget the veteran voices of baseball, the men who paint pictures with words. Guys like Milo Hamilton (HOU), Ken Harrelson (CWS), Dick Enberg (SD), Bob Uecker (MIL), Mike Shannon (STL), Marty Brennaman (CIN) and Vin Scully (LAD), who announced his plan to return to Chavez Ravine for 2013.

There you have it, sport fans. All the reasons you need to pass on September football come Sunday and turn on the National pastime instead, daring to catch a few laps of NASCAR or Formula One between innings.

So stock-up on beverages, pay that satellite bill, treat your wife with respect (she suffers the supermarket getting those snacks you’ll pound-down) forego the network’s pre-game drivel and plant yourself in that favorite chair for some good, hard-hitting…football! Heck, you can watch rounders all week long, but come Sunday in September, the NFL is just what the doctor ordered.

Steven Keys
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com