Tag:Mitt Romney
Posted on: October 29, 2012 1:30 am
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One Giant Leap for San Fran-kind

California and baseball, they were made for each other. They go together like hot dogs & mustard, guacamole & chips, politics & debate. Kismet.

Long before Walter O’Malley (Dodgers) and Horace Stoneham (Giants) moved their New York business interests cross-country to the Golden State (‘58), the game of baseball was already well-situated on the Pacific Coast, producing such gems as Joe DiMaggio (SF / Martinez) and Ted Williams (San Diego).

But a major league presence? That’s a whole ‘nother ball-game. Big doings.

And when the franchise moves were being planned in 1957, there was no question the Los Angeles team would have the bigger impact on the State and baseball. LA was three-times the size of San Francisco and since WW2 had been fast displacing the Bay area as the undeniable epicenter for the State’s burgeoning commerce and entertainment industry.

While the Giants fielded an impressive roster at their new digs with names like Mays, Cepeda, Perry, McCovey & Marichal, they would reach but one World Series before 1989, losing the memorable 1962 fall classic to long-time rival the Yankees, 4-3.

Down South the Dodgers hit the ground running. In only their second season in Chavez Ravine, the boys in blue hosted a World Series (‘59) and broke with tradition by taking it. Then they did it again in ‘63 and ‘65. Transplanted Brooklynites Walter Alston, Duke Snider, Koufax, Drysdale and LA original Maury Wills all became the talk of the nation.

Soon thereafter, three more teams would call California home: the Angels in 1961 (Anaheim ‘66); Charlie Finley’s Kansas City Athletics (Oakland ’68) and the fledgling San Diego Padres (‘69), owned today by Peter O‘Malley, son of Walter.

Though fan support has fluctuated, the As have been a stalwart organization, hoisting six pennants in Oakland, three times that of its NL rival across the Bay. The Padres have made two Series (‘84 / ‘98) and the Angels took their lone title in 2002.

It’s always been the Dodgers who’ve held a special place in the hearts of most Californians. A second wave of success in the 70s & 80s secured this spot as they appeared in five more Series, capturing crowns in ‘81 & ‘88.

But since those halcyon days of Garvey, Valenzuela, Hershiser, Gibson & Lasorda, there have been no more pennants unfurled over Dodger Stadium. Only broadcast legend Vin Scully, planning on a return in 2013, gives the grounds its championship feel.

You can‘t live off the past forever.

Even with some plucky mid-season moves in 2012 (Ramirez / Boston cast-offs) and new investor Earvin “Magic” Johnson joining the ownership group, the Dodgers again missed the post-season, forcing their fandom to watch arch-rival San Francisco bask in the glow of a playoffs spotlight to which they’re growing quite accustomed.

With the San Francisco Giants winning their second championship in three seasons (2010) by besting the heavily-favored Detroit Tigers 4-0 in World Series 2012, baseball aficionados are left scratching their heads in befuddlement.

Explanations for the surprising result range from the sensible (Giants’ pitching), to the whiney (DH fans), to my own guess (homer-happy AL can‘t adjust) and finally the strange (“funky spin” on the ball / ESPN’s Aaron Boone). That last one sounds like a “Dirk Diggler” dance move (Boogie Nights / ‘97).

To say the Giants’ victory is an upset rings as trite as saying ‘Have a nice day.’ I don’t know what an upset is anymore. Basketball excepted, the watch-words in today’s sporting world are ‘expect the unexpected.’ Exactly when & where the upset occurs, that’s the conundrum for prognosticators, week in, week out.

Can’t say the same for politics, unless you go back to 1948 and Harry “The buck stops here” Truman. That’s bad news for Mr. Romney, though he does have Diebold on his side (vote machines). And then there’s his ace in the hole, that GOP stand-by (10x) and vestige of our powder-wigged forefathers, the one, the only, tah-dah: Electoral College.

Tonight I'm sensing seismic waves emanating from the West Coast. But don’t be alarmed, California folk. I don’t mean the plate tectonic variety. What I sense is a major shifting in the balance of baseball power in your grand State.

The Giants 2012 World Series title moves the center of California’s baseball universe upstate to San Francisco, leaving the Dodgers, Angels, Padres and neighboring Athletics as mere satellites orbiting the bright star that has become the Giants.

And yes, stars can fade, just like the Dodgers did by way of a lackadaisical ownership that dates back to the early 90s. But this a big leap for the Bay area G-Men. Multiple titles will start the dynasty discussion and can be the first serious step towards becoming a standard-bearer organization, i.e., the Yankees, Red Wings, Lakers, Packers, Patriots.

Astronaut Neil Armstrong (1930-2012) took one doozey of a step back in 1969 when he left the safety of Apollo 11 and became the first Earthling to venture forth onto the meteor maligned surface of the Moon. The San Francisco Giants’ hope the historical step they took in Detroit this October 28, 2012 proves to be just as memorable to baseball fans as Mr. Armstrong’s famous step has been to the world.

Steven Keys
Can o' Corn
Posted on: October 4, 2012 12:57 am
 

NFL '12 Cherry Picks Wk-5

Now that the black hole that was ‘Replacement-Ref 2012’ has imploded and stopped devouring every sport-headline within its gravitational pull, we're back to the real business of the NFL: the hits, the blocks, the kicks, the passes and the runs.  Oh yeah, some flags too.

How ‘bout some cheese with that whine?

The referee roundabout had little effect on the good folk up in beer-land, or as it’s better know this season, whine & cheese country. The regulars returned to the not-yet-frozen tundra of Lambeau Field for Sunday night’s Saints v Packers contest and, if the crowd reaction is any indication, the financially-fixed referees better “fasten (their) seat belts, it’s going to be a bumpy-ride (B. Davis)” for the zebras this NFL 2012 season.

Patience is a Virtue

Football fans wonder if the JetsTim Tebow was swallowed-up by a black hole as he’s barely registered a blip on the NFL radar after turning the League on its head in 2011.

With Camp Romney trying to keep it close in Election 2012, Mitt’s fraternity of friends is doing its part. Jets’ owner Woody Johnson (“very important…Romney (become) President” / B-TV / 10-1), like John Elway (Romney “proven leader” / Huff-Post / 10-2), has no qualms about airing his political laundry. Maybe related, maybe not, but now the Tebow devotees (WJ) are growing more vocal in their push for Tim’s ascension to the Jets starting-QB job.

At just four games into the season (2-2) and with Sanchez’ experience, Jets’ coach Rex Ryan knows it’s premature to bail on Plan A. But it’s a QB-league and there may come a time soon enough when Mark pays a price, not only for his own debits, but for that of his teammates as well, specifically an erratic run-game, fumbleitis and porous run-defense.

Topsy-turvy NFC

While the AFC standings are no big surprise at Wk-5, the NFC has everyone crystal-ball gazing for answers. At this juncture, phrases like “this team is for real” and “their season is on the line” are about as meaningful as a NASA mission to Mars. Not very.

Cherry Picks Wk-5

Philadelphia Eagles (3-1) @ Pittsburgh Steelers (1-2) (10-7 / 1:00 / Fox)

The Keystone contest. Eagles are flying, but like Pack, Pats, Jets, Giants, etc., they’re “a box of chocolates: (so far) you never know what you’re gonna’ get (Forrest Gump).” You always know what you’ll get from Big Ben Roethlisberger, the Timex® QB: “takes a licking and keeps on ticking.” Steelers are home, healthier, ready to play and win.

Atlanta Falcons (4-0) @ Washington Redskins (2-2) (1:00 / Fox)

Last week’s squeaker at home against a groping Carolina team makes me nervous about these perfect birds, but Mike Turner’s turned-it-on (103 / CAR) and Ryan’s been terrific. If Griffin can learn to take sacks, limit his runs (7 / TB) and get comfy in the pocket, he might turn into a title-taking pro-QB. Should be a shootout but Falcons stay unbeaten.

Denver Broncos (2-2) @ New England Patriots (2-2) (4:25 / CBS)

AFC game of the week. As both Brady & Manning are finding their footing, expect the Ds to be busy. Patriots double-fisted run-attack (Ridley / Bolden) evokes memories of old (Csonka & Morris / Taylor & Hornung) and spells trouble for foes, if it lasts, though Broncos have ground-game in McGahee (112 / Oak). Another shootout. Continentals win.

Buffalo Bills (2-2) @ San Francisco 49ers (3-1) (4:25 / CBS)

Candlestick is not where Buffalo wants to be this weekend. Oh well, what are ya’ gonna’ do? Limit turnovers, that’s what (6/ NE). Fitzpatrick (4 Int / NE) takes page outta’ Alex Smith’s playbook, playing it safe & smart. Bills RB Spiller needs the ball more while LB Nick Barnett will roam far & wide (38T). San Fran loves the breeze by the Bay and is feeling their oats after dismantling the Jets, though I’m puzzled as to why rare-target Randy Moss is still rostered (4-1-3-0 Rec). Niners hit pay-dirt.

Houston Texans (4-0) @ New York Jets (2-2) (10-8 / 8:30 / ESPN)

ESPN-Disney likes the Nielsens. Typically a ‘Snoozer-of-the-Week,’ MNF is on a roll lately with Wk-3’s surreal affair (Packers / Seahawks) and what should be a ratings-hog this Monday night. Unless Sanchez matriculates with regularity, the camera-men and sideline-gals will be obsessing with Tebow. Had Jets battled SF, or not needed OT to best Miami, I’d pick a Jersey upset. Texans need a bigger test before elite status. This NY drama club ain’t it, but expect a contest as Jets can surprise. Houston’s top D along with a ‘measured & balanced’ offense (SF) will rule the day. Texans triumph.

Dedication

This post remembers two artists who died recently and who had tremendous impact on America’s TV sport-scene during its greatest period of change. With an encyclopedic knowledge of everything racing and a grabbing voice, Chris Economaki (9/28) defined motoring for millions of viewers since the 1960s, while Steve Sabol (9/18) took father Ed’s visionary work in NFL filming and, with the cool sounds of Sam Spence, made it all masterful. Time passed them both by in this attention-deficit age of social-network media, but for those of us who reveled in their realms, they will be missed.

Steven Keys
NFL Hunch Line
Posted on: April 26, 2012 2:22 pm
Edited on: April 30, 2012 3:15 pm
 

Goodell Looking Presidential

It’s a job that should come with a warning: “Careful what you wish for, you just might get it.”

The hours are long, there’s nearly no off-season, travel-time is taxing, fan-mail is sparse and the endless speeches, interviews & negotiations vacillate between dreary routine and stress-city.

But there is an upside.

The pay is sweet, prestige is high, there’s job security (if you keep owners happy), great seats anytime you want ’em and someone’s always around to carry your bags (pre-10PM).

The post is NFL Commissioner.

And nobody in the history of professional American football has been more skilled, more effective at doing the Commissioner thing than its current title-holder, Roger Goodell.

Pete Rozelle was a giant (1960-89). In facilitating the NFL / AFL merger (‘67), conceiving the Super Bowl and brokering the first big network, merchandising & labor contracts, Pete will always remain the League’s most significant Commissioner in its long history.

While Goodell faces many of the same challenges of his predecessors, he’s also faced with a slew of issues Rozelle couldn’t have even fathomed 30 years ago.

Bounties have been around for years, so the players claim. Believable enough. But the organizational guidance New Orleans gave its elaborate and sinister program had never before been uncovered nor contemplated by League admonishers.

Whenever money’s riding on the outcome or score of a sporting contest the risk of game-fixing exists. Though wagering on competitions goes back centuries, the explosion of fantasy prognosticating on individual player performance has created a whole new beast.

Alcohol has always been an issue in the pros, but it was in Rozelle’s day that illicit drug use burst onto the scene. Marijuana, speed & cocaine were the preferred poisons, ruining more than a few careers. Today it’s PEDs that taint the field. It’s the one test RG’s failed by letting DeMaurice Smith and the NFLPA call the dance tune and avoid blood-testing.

There’s one vexing issue Roger’s been spared that gave his predecessors fits: competition. No more troublesome, rival football fraternities fighting to feed at the money trough (AAFC / AFL / WFL / USFL). The Courts & Congress have played ball in validating the NFL monopoly and the good times just keep rollin’ along!

Every issue that crosses Goodell’s desk seems to get the full treatment: public & press are kept informed, player input is sought and when a League decision is reached, it’s clear, appears decisive and is announced in a timely, prudent fashion.

Roger’s got a skill-set, a style you’d hope to find in every corporate Suit and elected official, from school board member to President of the United States. He’s an intrepid decision-maker reminiscent of Presidents past, Teddy, FDR and Harry Truman.

Our current leader gets high marks for decisiveness on matters of national security (bin Laden) and foreign policy (Libya). That should get Mr. Obama a 2nd term, despite a tendency towards wind-gauging on the home-front.  But his challenger Mr. Romney has proven an even bigger tweaker than he, excepting on high-end tax cuts, of course.

It’s no secret Presidents today work chiefly for America’s elite, regardless of party. Not much choice, given the Court’s broad interpretation of speech (donations) and the big war-chest required for a White House win ($1B+). Even so, the savvy leader knows when to throw voters (fans) a bone, something to chew on to make us feel we’re being heard.

Whether it was last year’s CBA, the on-going Saints saga or his recent Papal-like mission to Minnesota to bring the flock back into the fold with words of hope AND warning, Roger takes bold action and throws fans something to chew on. And in the end, after the griping is done and all the dust has settled, most parties are satisfied.

In contrast, his peers (Stern / Bettman / Selig) will often take half-measures, playing it safe by trying to please / appease all factions, accomplish little and please no one.

if Metta (Artest) had behaved as badly in the NFL as he did recently on the NBA court, League response would’ve been swifter & stronger (given the video) than Mr. Stern’s measured, 3-day think-a-thon before issuing the modest 7-game suspension.

Roger wouldn’t get my hypothetical vote for President just yet.

First rule of business: NFL’s gotta’ stop tinkering with the Rule book. Though it’s well-intentioned, too frequent changes (Nike college) weaken fan trust, creates confusion and threatens traditional, foundational aspects of the game that even younger fans appreciate.

Second, institute pricing relief. The NFL & affiliates have been on the gravy-train for decades. It’s time to give something back to fandom by rolling-back stadium prices and cutting-back excessive, momentum-killing TV commercials and late-hour games.

Thirdly, do some LBJ arm-twisting, get on your bully-pulpit and persuade players to finally submit to HGH blood tests. It’s about integrity, safety and sending a message to America’s youth. Besides, player refusal is weak and without merit.

Accomplish these, Roger, and voters just might draft you for the White House in 2016.

Steven Keys
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com